1747 cookbook set to fetch up to $5,000 at auction

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A 1747 cookbook containing the very first English curry recipes will fetch up to $5,000 at auction.

It calls for rabbit or “poultry” and includes onions, peppercorns, rice, and roasted coriander seeds, but no ginger, garlic, or chili peppers.

Another recipe for “Pellow” — now called “Pilau” — includes pickled pork, poultry, cloves, white pepper, onion, rice, and is topped off with hard-boiled eggs.

The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, a 1747 cookbook containing the very first English curry recipes, is set to fetch up to $5,000 at auction.
Steve Chatterley/Zenger

The historical culinary treasures can be found in a recipe book called The art of cooking made easy bought in a London china shop 275 years ago.

The recipe for one of Britain’s most popular dishes called “Currey the India Way” was written by Hannah Glasse under the pen name “A Lady”.

The book once belonged to ex-soldier John Le Mesurier (1781-1843), who became the last hereditary governor of Alderney in the Channel Islands.

Cookbook auctioned
The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, a 1747 cookbook containing the very first English curry recipes, is set to fetch up to $5,000 at auction.

The recipe is just one of many in a collection that also includes some of the earliest examples of French cuisine and even a doctor warning people about the dangers of tea and coffee.

The collection has been carefully curated for over 40 years by the late Caroline Crisford, who was a passionate collector of quality cookbooks.

It offers unique insights into cooking and shows its development in Europe.

The entire collection, which will be auctioned online Thursday by London-based Forum Auctions, could fetch as much as $100,000.

Another rare jewel in the collection is called The French chefwritten by the founding father of French cuisine, François Pierre La Varenne (1615-1678).

He transformed medieval and Renaissance French cuisine into something even more exciting.

The pioneering chef brought bisque, béchamel and millefeuille to our tables and introduced the use of bouquet garni to the kitchen for the first time.

Written in 1651, the book is considered one of the most influential cookbooks of early French cuisine and was used until the 1789 Revolution.

A rare Italian second edition of the book is expected to fetch up to $3,600 at auction.

Another highlight of the collection is a rare first edition book by the well-known 17th-century physician Daniel Duncan, which warned people against the ‘abuse’ of hot beverages such as tea, coffee and hot chocolate.

Cookery made simple and easy
The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy was bought in a London china shop 275 years ago.
Steve Chatterley/Zenger

The book called Healthy advice against misusing hot spirits, especially coffee, chocolate, tea, brandy and strong watercould raise nearly $1,000.

When the drink first arrived in Britain in the mid-17th century, it caused confusion for many.

With tea from China, coffee from North Africa and chocolate (initially in liquid form until the 18th century) from the tropical rainforests of Central and South America, they were considered highly exotic by the public and therefore very popular.

Healthy advice book at auction
“Healthy advice against misusing hot spirits, especially coffee, chocolate, tea, brandy and strong water” could fetch nearly $1,000.
Steve Chatterley/Zenger

Their arrival and use left many medical professionals like Duncan very concerned that the new “substances” could harm the health of the nation.

He believed that the body is made up of four different substances or “humours” that need to be in balance: blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile.

Their imbalance was thought to threaten well-being and trigger illnesses that Duncan believed were triggered by the effects of caffeine and alcohol.

When they arrived in Britain, coffee, tea, chocolate and brandy were officially classified as drugs, not food, by doctors who considered them beneficial to health.

Recommended dosages have been prescribed only by doctors and pharmacists.

Tea was considered a decongestant, while coffee was said to help relieve headaches and ease digestion.

Chocolate was believed to help with childbirth and make people more beautiful, leading to women across the country starting to drink chocolate.

Brandy was introduced in the 16th century and was first used as a medicine because of its antiseptic properties.

A third cookbook called Le Cuisinier Gasconwhich dates from 1740, was written by Louis XIV’s grandson and is said to fetch up to $2,400.

Louis-Auguste II de Bourbon, Prince de Dombes (1700-1755) was a very accomplished home cook and the book contained many original recipes that were greatly admired for being easy to follow, yet impressive and delicious.

His culinary skills were most likely developed through small intimate dinner parties held for other members of the aristocracy.

The French cookbook La Varenne
Another rare gem in the collection is called The French Cook, written by the founding father of French cuisine, François Pierre La Varenne (1615-1678).
Steve Chatterley/Zenger

This story was provided by Newsweek Zenger News.

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