Amazing marble sculptures mimic sleek textures like fabric and skin

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The marble sculpture has been a trademark of the visual arts for centuries. Masters of the Renaissance and Baroque, such as Michelangelo and Bernini, showed their mastery of the medium by transforming the hard stone into supple textures like fabric and skin. Contemporary artist Håkon Anton Fagerås continues the tradition with its realistic depictions of objects, animals and people.

His ongoing series entitled Low captures the wrinkled, vibrant look of plush pillows. These carvings mimic the inviting look of pillows that have just been slept on due to their distinct folds. For Fagerås, this attention to detail – in all the individual folds and shadows that these folds create – is a way of suspending a moment in time. As with many soft fabrics, the pillows change with every touch, so the arrangement of the folds on each sculpture makes the piece unique.

Similarly, Fagerås takes the same care in depicting people. He smooths the marble to mimic the look of velvety skin by carefully modeling facial features and texturing the hair. It resembles classical sculptures from hundreds of years. In addition to objects and figurative sculptures, Fagerås also makes tiny creations in the form of various types of moth. These winged insects lay on a large marble slab that was spread apart so that the viewer could admire the shape of their wings and antennae.

Scroll down to see more amazing marble sculptures by Fagerås and keep following the artist Instagram to keep up to date with his latest projects.

The Norwegian artist Håkon Anton Fagerås skilfully forms “plush cushions”, realistic moths and portrait busts from white marble blocks.

Marble sculpture by Hakon Anton FagerasMarble sculpture by Hakon Anton FagerasMarble sculpture by Hakon Anton FagerasMarble sculpture by Hakon Anton FagerasMarble sculpture by Hakon Anton FagerasMarble sculpture by Hakon Anton FagerasMarble sculpture by Hakon Anton Fageras

Check out these videos to learn more about the artist’s creative process:

Håkon Anton Fagerås: website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met gave permission to show photos by Håkon Anton Fagerås.

On the subject of matching items:

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