Prison art by Kray twins and a letter to them from Francis Bacon will fetch £ 11,000 at auction

0

It’s a drawing of a cowboy that could easily have been made by a proud school child.

But the crayon was actually drawn by the gangster Reggie Kray – after he and his brother Ronnie were sentenced to life imprisonment for murder.

Now the drawing is one of three tickets related to the infamous Kray twins, which are sold by an anonymous seller later that evening.

The cowboy painting is expected to sell for between £ 1,000 and £ 1,500 at Chiswick Auctions in West London.

Also included in the sale is an oil painting of a crucifixion scene that Ronnie also painted behind bars. It could fetch £ 3,500.

A third lot is a typewritten letter from the famous painter Francis Bacon to Ronnie after the gangster sent him a drawing from his cell. It is expected to sell between £ 4,000 and £ 6,000.

Bacon wrote in September 1989 thanking Kray, incarcerated at Broadmoor Hospital, for the drawing and saying he was “glad to hear” he was okay, but added that he had “been sick for some time” may be.

He died less than three years later at the age of 82.

In 2015, Bacon’s long-time friend Michael Peppiatt revealed that the painter had told him that the two Kray twins kept sending him “very strange” drawings behind bars – even though they had previously ordered some of his works to be stolen from his London studio.

It’s a drawing of a cowboy that could easily have been made by a proud school child. But the crayon was actually drawn by the gangster Reggie Kray – after he and his brother Ronnie were sentenced to life imprisonment for murder. Now the drawing is one of the three lots relating to the infamous Kray twins and sold today by an anonymous collector

Also included in the sale is an oil painting of a crucifixion scene that Ronnie also painted behind bars.  It could fetch £ 3,500

Also included in the sale is an oil painting of a crucifixion scene that Ronnie also painted behind bars. It could fetch £ 3,500

Ronnie and Reggie became famous for their involvement in murder, armed robbery, assault and arson, and racketeering.

The nightclub owners mingled with politicians and celebrity entertainers such as Barbara Windsor and Frank Sinatra.

Their misdeeds finally came to an end when they were arrested in 1968 before being sentenced to life imprisonment a year later.

After they were sentenced, they were sent to separate prisons. Reggie Kray’s cowboy drawing was made while he was at HMP Wayland in Norfolk.

It’s on letterhead paper that bears Reggie’s picture, along with a quote that reads, “Life is not a trial, make the most of it”.

He was transferred there in 1997 after serving in Maidstone Prison in Kent. Reggie died in 2000 at the age of 66.

The Kray twins were among the most notorious gangsters in the East End of London

The Kray twins were among the most notorious gangsters in the East End of London

A third lot is a typewritten letter from the famous painter Francis Bacon to Ronnie after the gangster sent him a drawing from his cell.  It is expected to sell for between £ 4,000 and £ 6,000

A third lot is a typewritten letter from the famous painter Francis Bacon to Ronnie after the gangster sent him a drawing from his cell. It is expected to sell for between £ 4,000 and £ 6,000

In 2015, Bacon's longtime friend Michael Peppiatt revealed that the painter had told him how the two Kray twins had repeatedly sent him

In 2015, Bacon’s longtime friend Michael Peppiatt revealed that the painter had told him how the two Kray twins had repeatedly sent him “very strange” drawings behind bars

Although it is not known exactly when Ronnie painted the crucifixion scene, he was admitted to Broadmoor Safe Hospital in 1979 after serving the first decade of his sentence in ordinary prisons.

He was a Category A inmate and suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and was eventually classified as insane. He died in 1995 at the age of 61.

Bacon told his friend Michael Peppiatt that he gained the Krays unwanted attention after meeting them in the 1950s.

“I had a lot of rooms so I agreed and I never saw him again after that. He always seemed to be there, ”he said.

Ronnie and Reggie became famous for their involvement in murder, armed robbery, assault and arson, and racketeering

Ronnie and Reggie became famous for their involvement in murder, armed robbery, assault and arson, and racketeering

The nightclub owners mingled with politicians and celebrity entertainers such as Barbara Windsor and Frank Sinatra

The nightclub owners mingled with politicians and celebrity entertainers such as Barbara Windsor and Frank Sinatra

A few years later, however, Bacon is said to have been forced to buy back his own paintings at auction after they were stolen from his studio by one of the Krays employees.

When they went to jail, he added, “I still hear from you,” he told me. “They’re sending me these paintings they’re doing there. They are very strange, always from those soft landscapes with little houses in them. ‘

Bacon’s letter to Ronnie reads: “Thank you for your letter and the drawing. I am glad to hear that you are fine. I wish I could say the same about myself since I’ve been sick for a while. ‘

Ronnie Kray (left) toasts the future happiness of his brother Reggie Kray and Frances Shae after their marriage, which lasted just eight weeks before Frances left him

Ronnie Kray (left) toasts the future happiness of his brother Reggie Kray and Frances Shae after their marriage, which lasted just eight weeks before Frances left him

Who were the Kray twins?

Twins Ronnie and Reggie Kray were sentenced to life imprisonment in 1969 for a violent organized crime regime in London’s East End.

The brothers, later described as having a “love-hate relationship” and an “almost telepathic bond,” were implicated in a series of protection rackets, armed robberies, arson and murders.

The Kray twins were initially sent to separate prisons to serve their life sentences, but their mother Violet’s campaign for their reunification resulted in their being transferred to the same prison.

According to confidential prison records, the twins were referred to as “The Godfathers” – where they were both revered and feared by other inmates while at Parkhurst Prison, Isle of Wight.

Ronnie, 61, died of a heart attack at Broadmoor Hospital in 1995. His brother Reggie, 66, died of bladder cancer five years later.

Her older brother Charlie played a role in the company’s operations. He received a 10-year sentence and was released after serving seven years in 1975, but was convicted again in 1997 of conspiracy to smuggle £ 39 million worth of cocaine into the country in an undercover drug stab. He died shortly afterwards in 2000 of heart complications.

Twins Ronnie and Reggie Kray were sentenced to life imprisonment in 1969 for a violent organized crime regime in London's East End.  Pictured: The twins with their mother in front of their home in Bethnal Green, East London, in 1965

Twins Ronnie and Reggie Kray were sentenced to life imprisonment in 1969 for a violent organized crime regime in London’s East End. Pictured: The twins with their mother in front of their home in Bethnal Green, East London, in 1965


Source link

Share.

Leave A Reply