Two Long Beach museums reopen with exhibitions in honor of two renowned wall painters – Orange County Register

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Two of Long Beach’s most iconic museums are partnering with two of Los Angeles’ most respected murals as each venue reopens fully this week.

After the Museum of Latin American Art has only been open to museum members and with limited capacity since May 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic, it opened all of its galleries to the public on July 14th with the no mandatory restrictions (masks are recommended but not required) Exhibition reopened “Judy Baca: Memorias de Nuestra Tierra, a Retrospective”, which deals with the work of the wall painter and social activist from Chicano. It can be seen until January 2022.

“With Judy this is a great artist and a great show,” said Lourdes Ramos-Rivas, President and CEO of MOLAA.

And less than two miles away, the Long Beach Museum of Art will reopen to the public without restrictions on July 16 with Tristan Eaton: All At Once, an exhibition highlighting the 25-year career of the Los Angeles-based mural painter. Toy designer and artist.

  • The Museum of Latin American Art reopened all of its galleries to the public on July 14th with the exhibition “Judy Baca: Memorias de Nuestra Tierra, a Retrospective”, which deals with the work of the wall painter and social activist from Chicano. It can be seen until January 2022. (Courtesy photo of Molaa)

  • The Museum of Latin American Art reopened all of its galleries on July 14th with the exhibition “Judy Baca: Memorias de Nuestra Tierra, a Retrospective”, which deals with the work of the muralist and social activist from Chicano, including her 800 m long mural The Great Wall. (Courtesy photo of Molaa)

  • Tristan Eaton: All At Once, an exhibition exploring the 25-year career of Los Angeles-based mural painter, toy designer and visual artist Tristan Eaton, opens July 16 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. Here you can see the work of art by the artist that went into space last year. (Photo courtesy of the artist)

  • Tristan Eaton: All At Once, an exhibition exploring the 25-year career of Los Angeles-based mural painter, toy designer and visual artist Tristan Eaton, opens July 16 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. (Photo courtesy of the artist)

“He’s pretty amazing. He’s truly a visionary and I admire him deeply, ”said Ron Nelson, Executive Director of the Long Beach Museum of Art, which has only been open since April with limited capacity and by appointment.

When the doors fully open this weekend, people will enter the productive and eclectic artistic life of Eaton, whose multimedia artwork will span the entire two-story museum through October 3rd.

This is the first solo museum exhibition for the residents of Highland Park.

“Every artist kind of struggles with their own solidarity without knowing if it’s all going to be worth it, and that feels like a very happy pat on the back that I’m very grateful for,” said Eaton.

The renowned street artist began his career as an illustrator in the mid-1990s, designing hip-hop flyers and posters and labeling streets with graffiti.

He has since painted colorful murals around the world and is also a toy designer, whose works can be seen in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art. His art was even exhibited in space when he was hired to create pieces for Elon Musk’s SpaceX.

His Long Beach exhibition begins on the first floor, where visitors can see his early work, including record covers and flyers, as well as toys he designed for designer toy company Kidrobot, including one covered in blackboard paint and visitors to draw be encouraged.

The exhibition also includes a collection of fake street signs that he designed and installed in various public spaces, including one that reads “Fat Zone” that he installed in front of fast food restaurants in several cities.

“These are just crazy messages. I just wanted to play around with people’s heads, ”said Eaton.

There’s also a section devoted to its colorful murals, as well as its Marvel art prints, which are based on the Avengers.

In the exhibition, which he calls “The Unfair Fun Fair”, there is also a new interactive and socially provocative project in which people can play 911 roulette, among other things.

“You spin the wheel to see what happens when the cops show up. And the spinning wheel is actually a pie chart based on actual excessive force results, ”Eaton said. “Yes, it’s funny and sad at the same time, hence the Unfair Fun Fair.”

Another section is devoted to Eaton’s space travel, at least the space travel of his works of art.

Last year, his work with SpaceX went into orbit after Elon Musk commissioned him to create indestructible paintings on metal plates for delivery to the International Space Station.

“The actual artwork that went into space is on display here at the Long Beach Museum of Art, and I’m really excited because I’m a space nerd,” he said.

The great wall

While Eaton’s exhibit takes up the entire Long Beach Museum, Baca’s exhibit will be just as prominent as it is housed in MOLAA’s three main galleries.

The exhibition features multimedia works including sculptures, paintings, and ink drawings by the pioneering mural painter from Chicana, whose long career also included the launch of the City of Los Angeles Mural Program in 1974 to create more street paintings.

“Each of these pieces is like an old friend and a journey,” said Baca, who is perhaps best known for the Los Angeles Great Wall, a 800-meter-long mural painted in Tujunga Wash in the San Fernando Valley that tells the story History of California from Prehistoric Times to the 1950s.

The MOLAA exhibition includes a three-dimensional projection of the wall.

“I haven’t seen it yet so I’m really excited to see it, but it’s animation and photographic imagery that make the audience feel like they’re in the flow,” said Baca.

When you go

‘Judy Baca: Memorias de Nuestra Tierra, a Retrospective’: Exhibited until January 2022 at the Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach. 562-437-1689 or molaa.org.

‘Tristan Eaton: All At Once’: On display July 16 – Oct 3 at the Long Beach Museum of Art, 2300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach. 562-439-2119 or lbma.org.

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